Journey Forth

4 October, 2008

Kohlrabi

Filed under: Family,Food,Life,Random,The Good Life,Thoughts,Vegetables — by Karen @ 6:12 am

Kohlrabi is a member of the brassica family. It is a pale green or purple bulb shaped vegetable that often comes green stems and leaves attached. It is similar to a brocolli stem but milder and sweeter. It can be eaten raw or cooked.Kohlrabi can be substituted for turnip in any recipe, and is good steamed or boiled, sliced and stir-fried and added to stews or soups. It’s a good source of Vitamin C, as well as magnesium and phosphorous, which are useful in the absorption of calcium.

My favourite kohlrabi recipe is: Smothered Leaks and Kohlrabi 

Ingredients


3 leeks, trimmed and cut into 2cm lengths
2 kohlrabi (around 650g), trimmed, peeled and cut into 2cmcubes
3 large carrots (around 550g), peeled and cut into 2cm pieces
6 garlic cloves
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs fresh thyme
water, to cover
salt and freshly ground black pepper
40g butter

Method


1. Place the leeks, kohlrabi, carrots and garlic into a wide shallow pan which will take them in a single layer. Tuck the herbs down among them.
2. Pour in enough water to come about 1.5cm up the sides of the pan. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and dot with butter.
3. Bring up to the boil, then reduce the heat to the absolute minimum. Cover the pan with a lid or foil and leave to cook very gently for about an hour, stirring occasionally to make sure that it doesn’t catch. If necessary add an extra splash of water, or if it ends up too watery, uncover and boil the water off. Either way, you are aiming to end up with meltingly tender vegetables, perhaps slightly patched with brown towards the end of cooking, with little more than a few tablespoonfuls of syrupy liquid left in the pan. Serve warm.

Preparation time less than 30 mins – Cooking time 1 to 2 hours

Recipe by Sophie Grigson

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